closetpoesie

"find tongues in trees, books in the running brooks" -- William Shakespeare

Beauty is unbearable, drives us to despair, offering us for a minute the glimpse of an eternity that we should like to stretch out over the whole of time.

—Albert Camus  (via samsaranmusing)

(via allgreendreams)

phylliscoppolino:

Prothonotary warbler by geno k on Flickr.
Bonds View Road, Macon, Georgia. In regards to the nesting of this species Bent writes, “The prothonotary warbler and Lucy’s warbler are the only two American warblers that habitually build their nests in cavities, usually well concealed.” He goes on to add however, “Many and varied are the odd nesting sites occupied by prothonotary warblers…Nests have been found in buildings, on beams and other supports” He mentions nests being found in a coffee can, in a paper sack, in a mail box, in a box on a moving ferry boat, in a Chinese lantern on a pavilion, and in an old hornet’s nest. One fascinating nest story he tells was reported by John W. Moyer (1930) who learned of it from people living in a farm house along the Kankakee River. “A pair of these warblers built their nests and raised their broods for three consecutive seasons in the pocket of an old hunting coat, hung in a garage; each year the man cleaned out the nest and used the coat in the fall, and the next spring the birds used it again.” From part one of Life Histories of North American Wood Warblers by A. C. Bent

phylliscoppolino:

Prothonotary warbler by geno k on Flickr.

Bonds View Road, Macon, Georgia.
In regards to the nesting of this species Bent writes, “The prothonotary warbler and Lucy’s warbler are the only two American warblers that habitually build their nests in cavities, usually well concealed.” He goes on to add however, “Many and varied are the odd nesting sites occupied by prothonotary warblers…Nests have been found in buildings, on beams and other supports” He mentions nests being found in a coffee can, in a paper sack, in a mail box, in a box on a moving ferry boat, in a Chinese lantern on a pavilion, and in an old hornet’s nest. One fascinating nest story he tells was reported by John W. Moyer (1930) who learned of it from people living in a farm house along the Kankakee River. “A pair of these warblers built their nests and raised their broods for three consecutive seasons in the pocket of an old hunting coat, hung in a garage; each year the man cleaned out the nest and used the coat in the fall, and the next spring the birds used it again.”

From part one of Life Histories of North American Wood Warblers by A. C. Bent

the-paintrist:

arcadiainteriorana:

Asher Brown Durand (American, 1796–1886) - The Catskill Valley - 1863
Oil on canvas.
Philbrook Museum of Art.


The Catskill Mountains or the Catskills are a large area in the southeastern portion of the U.S. state of New York. They are located approximately 100 miles north-northwest of New York City and forty miles southwest of Albany, starting just west of the Hudson River. The Catskills occupy much or all of five counties (Delaware, Greene, Schoharie, Sullivan, and Ulster). As a cultural and geographic region, the Catskills are generally defined as those areas close to or within the borders of the Catskill Park, a 700,000-acre (2,800 km2) forest preserve protected from many forms of development under New York state law.
The Catskills are well known in American culture, both as the setting for many 19th-century Hudson River School paintings and as the favored destination for urban vacationers from New York City in the mid-20th century. The region’s many large resorts gave countless young stand-up comedians an opportunity to hone their craft. In addition, the Catskills have long been a haven for artists, musicians, and writers, especially in and around the towns of Woodstock and Phoenicia, New York.

the-paintrist:

arcadiainteriorana:

Asher Brown Durand (American, 1796–1886) - The Catskill Valley - 1863

Oil on canvas.

Philbrook Museum of Art.

The Catskill Mountains or the Catskills are a large area in the southeastern portion of the U.S. state of New York. They are located approximately 100 miles north-northwest of New York City and forty miles southwest of Albany, starting just west of the Hudson River. The Catskills occupy much or all of five counties (Delaware, Greene, Schoharie, Sullivan, and Ulster). As a cultural and geographic region, the Catskills are generally defined as those areas close to or within the borders of the Catskill Park, a 700,000-acre (2,800 km2) forest preserve protected from many forms of development under New York state law.

The Catskills are well known in American culture, both as the setting for many 19th-century Hudson River School paintings and as the favored destination for urban vacationers from New York City in the mid-20th century. The region’s many large resorts gave countless young stand-up comedians an opportunity to hone their craft. In addition, the Catskills have long been a haven for artists, musicians, and writers, especially in and around the towns of Woodstock and Phoenicia, New York.